On Why You Should Stick to Healthy Diets

Rebecca Harrington writes a both funny and insightful piece about what Marilyn Monroe said she ate in an interview for the Peagant Magazine, in 1952.

Marilyn says she only eats two raw eggs in milk for breakfast, skips lunch and eats a broiled dinner of liver, steak or lamb and eat it with 5 raw carrots, after which she would have an fudge sundae.

This morning, I wake up and know one thing: I am hungry, and today is the day liver comes into Whole Foods. I am very excited because I have never had beef liver before. As I drink my egg milk, I imagine the liver awaiting me, quivering in its meat case. What I should do with it? Could it be good with ketchup?

Harrington writes.

I am so hungry that I eat a lamb dinner at 3 p.m. Feel very tired and heavy. Can’t tell if I am losing weight. I suspect this is a diet one can only do while also using recreational barbituates.

If you’re trying to motivate yourself to eat healthier do read this piece. It will remind you of what bad food does to you.

Grilled Broccoli with Hummus Sauce and Roasted Sesame Seeds

This has to be one of the easiest dinner ideas ever. You only need: fresh broccoli, canned chickpeas, lemon, salt and pepper. Some fresh parsley would be nice too.

Make the humus first: add 2 garlic cloves to a can of chickpeas and the juice of half a lemon and zzzap everything together until creamy and soft. Add salt and pepper to taste, but don’t overdo it. If you’re brave add a small pinch of cinnamon and a spoon of honey to it, it’s really tasty.

Proceed to roasting the sesame seeds in a small pan. Add a teaspoon of water and the third of a pinch of salt, the keep the seeds moving in the pan until they turn a warmer brown (not black :).

On to the broccoli. Get some olive oil into the palm of your hand and rub your hands together, then massage the broccoli florets with it before grilling it. You don’t need to put too much. Grill then mix with the humus, as you would with pasta.

Photo and Idea adapted from Babble.

To Do this Month: Plant Your Own Garlic

Did you know that one of the best moments to plan garlic is mid September to mid October? Neither did I.

It seems like the garlic “sleeps” during winter and if planted around this time of year it grows green and tall (and very importantly – by itself) in spring.

What to do:

1. Break a garlic bulb in cloves, making sure you keep the papery skin covering each clove intact. Take a big jar and fill it with water, a spoon of baking soda and another one of liquid seaweed. Immerse the garlic in this water for 2 hours prior to planting to prevent fungus.

2. Plant them in a pot or your garden 6 to 8 inches apart from each other, making sure the pointy side is facing up.

3. Cover them with soil and compost and let rest for the winter. If you can find some dry grass or straw cover the soil with them, then water your garlic. In 4 to 6 weeks you will start seeing the tips of your garlic but worry not, it will stop growing in winter.

This is an idea I found in the November 2009 issue of the Organic Gardening magazine. Image from here.

Sweet Paul’s Summer Edition is Out [And You’ll Like it!]

Sweet Paul’s summer edition is out. And it’s juicy and colourful and super mouth-watering, so go over there and give it a good read.

We start with these fancy and yummy for sure summer cupcakes,

then proceed to discussing picnics and burgers.

The fish and seafood pages are difficult to resist.

And there’s a lot of colour and fruit juice in the Mexican pops feature.

And what a better way to conquer this Foodie’s heart than with caramel popcorn to go?

And that’s not all, there is also a Sweet Paul blog!

300 Kilos Fresh Tuna in Tokio

For most of us Tuna is what you can find in the flaky flesh cans at the supermarket. Or, worse, what your cat eats. But Tuna is a delicacy. Unlike most fish, Tuna’s meat can vary in colour from white to dark pink. The dark pink tuna looks just like beef. It’s dense, yet soft and flavoury.

This is what I discovered over last night’s dinner 🙂

Today I stumbled upon an article about Tuna fishing in Tokio in the latest number of the Travel and Leisure Magazine. The photography is extraordinary. Look at those 300 kilos monsters!

 

7 Surprising Uses for Olive Oil [Know Your Food]

Olive oil. Pressed cold from green olives, is one of the healthiest and flavoured oils there are. You used it in salad dressings, for frying and baking low cholesterol sweets. But did you know it can be used as a green cleaner in your house or that it can replace at least three of the plastic bottles you keep in your bathroom?

image by El Aderezo - Blog de Recetas de Cocina

Shoes – Clean leather shoes with a damp cloth, then wipe them with a clean cloth on which you’ve dropped a bit of vegetable oil. Not only they will make the leather softer, but it will protect it from cracking. Continue reading “7 Surprising Uses for Olive Oil [Know Your Food]”

Emilie Griottes: The Ultimate Eye (and Tummy) Candy

“She wrote back!” I almost shouted to my fellow foodie Anna this morning over coffee. You see, a few weeks ago I had discovered the brilliant and talented Emilie Griottes, her Pantone tarts, her sugar snowed meringues and flavoured butters.

Emilie Griottes is a 26 year old Art Director and Foodie living in Paris. Her food styling skills and taste for irresistible eye candy are amazing.

I haven’t seen something this inspiring for some time now, so you can imagine my excitement this morning when Emilie emailed me with the answers to the few (shy) questions I’ve asked her.

Here is the mini-interview :

This Foodie: Who is Emilie Griottes and what does she do? 🙂

Emilie Griottes: “I am a French girl based in paris. I am artistic director, I’ve studied graphic design and I am passionate about cooking and photography!”

Your blog is delicious. You’re painting and illustrating with food. How did it all start?

“As I was doing graphic design, I always liked the relationship cooking and design. A combination of my passion and my profession! So I try to find colors and materials in each dish to make a living picture!”

We first taste a dish with the eye. Then come […] the flavors 

How important is it for you for the food you make and photograph to be tasty?

“We first taste a dish with the eye. Then comes the taste in the mouth, the flavors .. I like the idea that it is disappointed by either one or the other. It must be beautiful to look AND good; its very important! If you are disappointed, the experience will not be as intense!”

Where do you get your ideas from?

“The ideas come from everywhere! A color in the street, a moment in the subway, mouthfeel for a dish. Everything is important! Every little detail of your daily life must be observed. I attach great importance to observation. And sometimes when I sleep I dream of ideas! It’s great! Unless I forget my dreams … ;)”

Every little detail of your daily life must be observed

Apart from Fricote, I saw you started a column in Holly Becker’s Decor8, where else can we find your work?

“I work more for French or American magazines and sites! I would soon be in several places and blogs, but it’s still top secret … ;)”

What cool things are you working on/planning at the moment?

“A little weekend in Stockholm is planned for late April, it’s my leitmotiv ! Otherwise I am preparing a buffet for a birthday, and especially I work for my little Etsy shop! It’s lots of work, I will sell small items for the office! I hope you’ll like it!”

If I like it? The world can’t have enough of Emilie Griottes nowadays so This Foodie is looking forward to seeing more and more of her work.